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Diverse Risk Perceptions of Low Dose Radiation of People Living Near Nuclear Power Stations in Ontario, Canada | Abstract
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Journal of Nuclear Energy & Power Generation Technologies

Abstract

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Citations : 12

Journal of Nuclear Energy & Power Generation Technologies received 12 citations as per Google Scholar report

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Diverse Risk Perceptions of Low Dose Radiation of People Living Near Nuclear Power Stations in Ontario, Canada

Author(s): Hurlbert Margot*, Condor Jose, Shasko Larissa and Landrie-Parker Dazawray

Through survey and focus group this research explored the perceptions of residents in Ontario, Canada surrounding risk, trust, knowledge and benefits of radiation. Results were analyzed in relation to those living in proximity to Nuclear Power Stations (NPS) and those who did not, and those who worked with radiation, and those who did not. People living in proximity to NPS in Ontario are not ambivalent to its benefits; radiation workers in this area have statistically significant positive emotions to radiation and trust in the nuclear regulator; and there is not a significant minority living near a NPS that are distrustful of the nuclear industry. While radiation workers living proximate to NPSs have higher perceptions of being at risk for cancer and radon risk than people not living in this proximity, the public living in this zone has less perception of these risks. Two focus groups conducted in communities with NPS also corroborated some risk concerns regarding cancer and radon, but a lack of concern for Low Dose Radiation (LDR). This research has important policy implications surrounding interest and understanding of people in relation to radiation and further research and work to address misperceptions.

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